Space Leech
TUMBLRS I FOLLOW: PART 1

It’s time I’ve gave a shout out to some of the people I follow on tumblr, because they’re pretty neato. Check after the break.

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Spaceleech’s Top Ten Art Books: #10

Like I said earlier, I wanted to experiment with longer posts, so I will be counting down my top ten favorite art books.

Why art books? They give us insight into the creative process, they help us understands the trials and tribulations of our favorite artists as they give shape to their visions, and sometimes they’re just nice to keep by your nightstand and flip through.

Each book will get a write-up and while I don’t really have a schedule for them, I wont keep you waiting too long between entries. Also, the list order does not reflect rank or preference.

So without further ado, here’s  book #10…

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If you’re like me, and I know I am, then you stay up into the wee hours of the night wondering what films influenced Katsuhiro Otomo’s Akira.
Well thanks to the book Akira Mechanix 2019, I found this handy list of what movies helped create everyone’s favorite story about drug addicted teen bikers with super powers.
This list also reaffirms my belief that Japanese otakus and manga authors fucking love Mad Max.
1984 (the one with John Hurt)
WarGames
Alien (hey, another movie with John Hurt)
Aliens
Scanners
Damnation Alley
The Terminator
Tron
Burst City (only Japanese movie on the list)
The Fury
Blade Runner
Max Headroom
Mad Max
Mad Max 2
The Revengers
Brazil
Metropolis
The Running Man
Now fire up your laserdisc players and get watching!

If you’re like me, and I know I am, then you stay up into the wee hours of the night wondering what films influenced Katsuhiro Otomo’s Akira.

Well thanks to the book Akira Mechanix 2019, I found this handy list of what movies helped create everyone’s favorite story about drug addicted teen bikers with super powers.

This list also reaffirms my belief that Japanese otakus and manga authors fucking love Mad Max.

  • 1984 (the one with John Hurt)
  • WarGames
  • Alien (hey, another movie with John Hurt)
  • Aliens
  • Scanners
  • Damnation Alley
  • The Terminator
  • Tron
  • Burst City (only Japanese movie on the list)
  • The Fury
  • Blade Runner
  • Max Headroom
  • Mad Max
  • Mad Max 2
  • The Revengers
  • Brazil
  • Metropolis
  • The Running Man

Now fire up your laserdisc players and get watching!

A subject I have a lot of interest in, but can’t find much info on, is the reception of western cartoons in Japan.
The book Anime Bible 2002 offers a list of what was considered to be the 45 best (or maybe most remarkable) American cartoons.
But since the book is in Japanese, I have no idea who is doing the judging or by what criteria, though the list seems to organized more by chronology than as a measure of quality.
1.      Steamboat Willie, 1928
2.      Bambi, 1942
3.      Superman, 1941
4.      Tom & Jerry, 1940
5.      Popeye, 1933
6.      Felix the Cat, 1919
7.      The Flintstones, 1960
8.      The Jetsons, 1962
9.      The Little Lulu Show, 1935
10.   The Looney Tunes, 1930
11.   Tiny Toon Adventures, 1991
12.   Sylvester and Tweety Mysteries, 1947(?)  (The Sylvester and Tweety Mysteries premiered in ‘95.  So they probably meant to list the original Sylvester and Tweety cartoons)
13.   Scooby Doo, Where Are You?, 1969
14.   Scooby & Scrappy-Doo Show, 1969.  (Really, Japan?)
15.   Josie & The Pussycats, 1970
16.   The Wacky Races, 1968
17.   Dastardly and Muttley in Their Flying Machines, 1969
18.   The Fantastic Four, 1967
19.   Spider-Man, 1967
20.   Transformers, 1984
21.   He-Man and The Masters of the Universe, 1983
22.   G.I. Joe, 1983
23.   Birdman and the Galaxy Trio, 1967
24.   Johnny Quest, 1964
25.   Batman, 1992
26.   Batman Beyond/Batman of the Future, 1999
27.   X-Men: Evolution, 2001
28.   Justice League, 2001
29.   The Simpsons, 1989
30.   Dexter’s Lab, 1995
31.   The PowerPuff Girls, 1998
32.   Cow & Chicken, 1997
33.   Angela Anaconda, 1999
34.   Ed, Edd’n Eddy, 1999
35.   Space Ghost, 1986.  (This entry is kind of confusing.  The book uses a picture from Space Ghost Coast to Coast, which premiered in ‘94, but Space Ghost first came out  in 1966.  It could be referring to the show Space Stars from 1981 which had Space Ghost segments.)
36.   Johnny Bravo, 1997
37.   Iron Giant, 1999
38.   ReBoot, 1994
39.   Beast Wars, 1996
40.   Toy Story, 1995
41.   Atlantis, 2001
42.   South Park, 1997
43.   Spawn, 1997
44.   Samurai Jack, 2001
45.   Shadow Raiders, 1998
So there you have it.  The list seems to be geared more towards TV shows, but it has a few movies too.  Kinda wish it listed some more off-beat examples of animation.  Where’s Heavy Metal?

A subject I have a lot of interest in, but can’t find much info on, is the reception of western cartoons in Japan.

The book Anime Bible 2002 offers a list of what was considered to be the 45 best (or maybe most remarkable) American cartoons.

But since the book is in Japanese, I have no idea who is doing the judging or by what criteria, though the list seems to organized more by chronology than as a measure of quality.

1.      Steamboat Willie, 1928

2.      Bambi, 1942

3.      Superman, 1941

4.      Tom & Jerry, 1940

5.      Popeye, 1933

6.      Felix the Cat, 1919

7.      The Flintstones, 1960

8.      The Jetsons, 1962

9.      The Little Lulu Show, 1935

10.   The Looney Tunes, 1930

11.   Tiny Toon Adventures, 1991

12.   Sylvester and Tweety Mysteries, 1947(?)  (The Sylvester and Tweety Mysteries premiered in ‘95.  So they probably meant to list the original Sylvester and Tweety cartoons)

13.   Scooby Doo, Where Are You?, 1969

14.   Scooby & Scrappy-Doo Show, 1969.  (Really, Japan?)

15.   Josie & The Pussycats, 1970

16.   The Wacky Races, 1968

17.   Dastardly and Muttley in Their Flying Machines, 1969

18.   The Fantastic Four, 1967

19.   Spider-Man, 1967

20.   Transformers, 1984

21.   He-Man and The Masters of the Universe, 1983

22.   G.I. Joe, 1983

23.   Birdman and the Galaxy Trio, 1967

24.   Johnny Quest, 1964

25.   Batman, 1992

26.   Batman Beyond/Batman of the Future, 1999

27.   X-Men: Evolution, 2001

28.   Justice League, 2001

29.   The Simpsons, 1989

30.   Dexter’s Lab, 1995

31.   The PowerPuff Girls, 1998

32.   Cow & Chicken, 1997

33.   Angela Anaconda, 1999

34.   Ed, Edd’n Eddy, 1999

35.   Space Ghost, 1986.  (This entry is kind of confusing.  The book uses a picture from Space Ghost Coast to Coast, which premiered in ‘94, but Space Ghost first came out  in 1966.  It could be referring to the show Space Stars from 1981 which had Space Ghost segments.)

36.   Johnny Bravo, 1997

37.   Iron Giant, 1999

38.   ReBoot, 1994

39.   Beast Wars, 1996

40.   Toy Story, 1995

41.   Atlantis, 2001

42.   South Park, 1997

43.   Spawn, 1997

44.   Samurai Jack, 2001

45.   Shadow Raiders, 1998

So there you have it.  The list seems to be geared more towards TV shows, but it has a few movies too.  Kinda wish it listed some more off-beat examples of animation.  Where’s Heavy Metal?